Book Review: Who Do You Think You Are? (Driscoll)

I am admittedly posting this review before finishing up the book, but I feel that I have a solid enough grasp on the direction, intention, and contribution of this book that it will be just as beneficial.

This book, for me, definitely seems like a little bit of a different perspective than the typical Mark Driscoll books of old. Being a part of the Acts 29 Network, and even using a couple of his books for Deacon School curriculum, I consider myself somewhat educated on the way Driscoll does and communicates certain things. With this book, it’s definitely a breath of fresh air. It’s as if this concept really captured his affections and truly directed the writing of the book.

This book serves as a guided commentary of sorts through the book of Ephesians and examines the concept of identity.

Where do you find your identity? WHO or WHAT may determine your identity? How does your identity affect who you are, what you do, and how you think? And most importantly, how does our identity affect our relationship with God?

All of these questions are addressed and wrestled through within the text.

If you’ve been opposed to Driscoll in the past because of his brash style, abrupt tone, and proud demeanor, I would encourage you to pick this book up and give it a fair chance. He appears to me as tender, caring, and well-versed in this topic, and I would argue that this could be the single most important thing for us to “get” as Christians.

God must be the foundation of our identity or else it’s idolatry, and I believe this book is a much needed contribution to the concept of our identity in Christ and what it looks like to functionally, practically, prayerfully, and devotionally live out of that identity to focus our lives on giving Christ glory.

A complimentary copy of this book was provided for review purposes by the publisher. I was not required to post a positive review and the views expressed in this review are my own.

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