5 – A Collection of Studd-ly Quotes

CT Studd, the famous English Cricketer from the mid 1800’s, was a pioneer in missions to China, India, and the heart of Africa.  When he entered into central Africa at age 53, sickly and against the wisdom of doctors, mission boards, and friends, it was yet another demonstration of his utter dependence upon Jesus for life, health, and financial resources.  His words often convey the strongest language of radical abandon and total dependence on Jesus.  Here are several of his more pithy statements.

 

  • Let us not glide through this world and then slip quietly into heaven, without having blown the trumpet loud and long for our Redeemer, Jesus Christ. Let us see to it that the devil will hold a thanksgiving service in hell, when he gets the news of our departure from the field of battle.
  • Some wish to live within the sound of church or chapel bell.  I want to run a rescue shop within a yard of hell.
  • Funds are low again, hallelujah! That means God trusts us and is willing to leave His reputation in our hands.
  • The best cure for discouragement or qualms is another daring plunge of faith.
  • How could I spend the best years of my life in living for the honours of this world, when thousands of souls are perishing every day?
  • Difficulties, dangers, disease, death, or divisions don’t deter any but Chocolate Soldiers from executing God’s Will. When someone says there is a lion in the way, the real Christian promptly replies, “That’s hardly enough inducement for me; I want a bear or two besides to make it worth my while to go.”
  • Don’t go into the study to prepare a sermon — that’s nonsense. Go into your study to God and get so fiery that your tongue is like a burning coal and you have got to speak.
  • Marriage can be a great blessing or a great curse, depending on where you place the Cross.
  • I am getting desperately afraid of going to heaven for I have had the vision of the shame I shall suffer as I get my first glimpse of the Lord Jesus; His majesty, power and marvellous love for me, who treated Him so meanly and shabbily on earth, and acted as though I did Him a favour in serving Him! No wonder God shall have to wipe away the tears off all faces, for we shall be broken-hearted when we see the depth of His love and the shallowness of ours.
  • Our recruits come out from home vastly raw and are largely parrots. They have been crammed with religion as though for an examination, and seem to come out to carry on their education rather than finish it. So many are just taught doctrines without ever having thought them out or searched the Scriptures for themselves. They come out like infants with pop guns. They need to be trained into soldiers with real devil-defying weapons. Some arrive thinking they are the last thing in high-class Christianity and have to find out they know little. That is why I keep the newcomers here at base for a time till I can make them really think out things and settle questions, not from hearsay but from Bible-say.
  • The best training for a soldier of Christ is not merely a theological college. They always seem to turn out sausages of varying lengths, tied at each end, without the glorious freedom a Christian ought to abound and rejoice in. You see, when in hand-to-hand conflict with the world and the devil, neat little biblical confectionery is like shooting lions with a pea-shooter: one needs a man who will let himself go and deliver blows right and left as hard as he can hit, trusting in the Holy Ghost. It’s experience, not preaching that hurts the devil and confounds the world. The training is not that of the schools but of the market: it’s the hot, free heart and not the balanced head that knocks the devil out. Nothing but forked-lightning Christians will count. A lost reputation is the best degree for Christ’s service. It is not so much the degree of arts that is needed, but that of hearts, loyal and true, that love not their lives to the death: large and loving hearts which seek to save the lost multitudes, rather than guard the ninety-nine well-fed sheep in the pen.
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